Anasazi

The Ancient Ones
       
  • Our only clues to their existence are what they left behind – homes deserted, desert walls etched with their symbols and art and the leftover things they used in their daily lives. It all amounts to the pieces of a giant jig saw puzzle, without the finished pattern to go from and not sure if we even have all the pieces.
 
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 Corn on and off the cobb
In a private gallery in southern Utah I found these artifacts, found just as they were left by the Anasazi. This pot shows the kernals ready for grinding and the corn that was grown by the Anasazi. 
 Three pots on a shelf
Notice the intricate details on the bowls of the Anasazi pottery. 
 Two pots on a shelf
Another example of the Anasazi workmanship 
 Yucca Rope
The strength of the yucca plant fiber was used to create rope for the Anasazi. 
 Corn and Twine in a pot
Pots stored the twine and corn of the Anasazi 
 Pots on a shelf
I feel like a museum curator, with a lack of new names for my displays. This shelf holds a complete collection of Anasazi pottery that I personally find beautiful. 
What can you discover when you walk through the vacated home of someone?Perhaps toys are left on a closet shelf, or posters were left on the walls, maybe a leftover garbage sack filled with papers and trash? So it is with the Anasazi, a people who occuppied the southern portion of Utah for some 1200 years ending in 1200 AD. Then they left. No one is really sure why, perhaps a drought forced them from their homes. Our only clues to their existence are what they left behind – homes deserted, desert walls etched with their symbols and art and the leftover things they used in their daily lives. It all amounts to the pieces of a giant jig saw puzzle, without the finished pattern to go from and not sure if we even have all the pieces. Here are my favorite places to discover the Trail of the Ancients:  
  • Edge of the Cedars Museum and State Park in Blanding. This is the finest source for information on the Anasazi, including displays and exhibits telling the tale of the Anasazi.
  • Anasazi Indian Village State Park – There are some excellent interpretive materials at this park. The ruins have signs explaining the use of each room and structure.
  • Four Ruins Road – This short drive highlights four ruins and interprets the occupation of each of the sites.
  • Hovenweep National Monument – southern Utah’s finest ruins, easily viewed from the short hike around the canyon rim. The trail guide explains much about the Anasazi.
Rock art is covered by a seperate feature all of its own.
 

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